syslog
12Apr/120

Liveblog: EuroSys 2012 — Day 2

Posted by Malte Schwarzkopf

EuroSys 2012Various people from Cambridge are currently in Bern für EuroSys 2012, and will be reporting live from the conference here, as well as summarizing the trends and highlights afterwards.

The second day has kicked off, and we will be providing the usual live update service below the fold -- click "continue reading" to get there!

11Apr/122

Liveblog: EuroSys 2012 – Day 1

Posted by Malte Schwarzkopf

EuroSys 2012 Various people from Cambridge are currently in Bern für EuroSys 2012, and will be reporting live from the conference here, as well as summarizing the trends and highlights afterwards.

So here goes -- we're kicking off. Read more below the fold!

18Apr/110

Functional Programming Gone Wild (in the SRG)

Posted by Anil Madhavapeddy

There have been a bunch of projects related to functional programming going on in the SRG recently, and many of them relevant beyond "just" the programming language crowd.

10Apr/110

Systems for Future Multi-Core Architectures

Posted by Derek Murray

Today was workshop day at EuroSys 2011, and I spent the day at the inaugural SFMA workshop. The aim of the workshop was to bring together practitioners from the fields of operating system, programming language and computer architecture research, and provoke discussion about new trends in parallel computing. The most notable thing about the workshop was the number of practitioners that it attracted, starting off with standing room only at 9am in the morning, and maintaining a respectable audience of 35 people through to 5pm. I was on the program committee for the workshop, and Ross did a great job of organising the whole thing.

6Apr/110

Supporting control flow in the CIEL execution engine

Posted by Derek Murray

CIEL - a universal execution engineHow do you write a program that runs on hundreds or thousands of computers? Over the last decade, this has become a real concern for many companies that must be able to handle ever-growing data sets in order to stay in business. When those data sets grow to terabytes or petabytes in size, a single disk (or even a RAID array) can't deliver the data fast enough, so a solution is needed to exploit the throughput of hundreds or thousands of disks in parallel. In this post, I'll introduce various solutions to this problem, and explain how our CIEL execution engine supports a larger class of algorithms than existing systems.